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Comparative pathology and Pathogenesis

The Comparative Pathology and Pathogenesis Group studies the mechanism of disease caused by virus infections in people, animal reservoirs and laboratory animals, with the ultimate goal to mitigate or even prevent virus-induced illness and mortality.
Recent achievements of this group are the discovery of novel routes of entry of influenza virus in mammalian hosts, identification of an unusual pattern of attachment of the recently emerged H7N9 influenza virus to the human respiratory tract, and elucidation of the clinical effect of influenza in the wild bird reservoir. Their current focus is the pathogenesis of influenza-associated pneumonia and encephalitis, comparison of viral infections between bats and people, and identification of underlying factors for viruses to cross the species barrier from wildlife reservoirs to humans.

Comparative pathology 1
Figure 1: HE staining of a normal of a ferret bronchiolus

Ongoing research projects

The Comparative pathology and Pathogenesis group of the department of Virology has two ongoing research projects:

  • Pathogenesis of influenza-associated pneumonia and encephalitis
  • Identification of underlying factors for viruses to cross the species barrier from wildlife reservoirs to humans.

Get to know these research projects and researches by scrolling down.

  

Pathogenesis of influenza-associated pneumonia and encephalitis

Research team: 

Prof. Thijs Kuiken, DVM PhD DACVP
Debby van Riel, PhD
Judith van den Brand, DVM PhD DECVP
Edwin Veldhuis-Kroeze, DVM DECVP (PhD student)
Jurre Siegers, MSc (PhD student)
Lonneke Leijten , BSc
Marco van de Bildt, BSc
Peter van Run, BSc
Rebecca Veeris, BSc


Selection of publications:

 

Identification of underlying factors for viruses to cross the species barrier from wildlife reservoirs to humans

Research team:

Prof. Thijs Kuiken, DVM PhD DACVP
Judith van den Brand, DVM PhD DECVP
Debby van Riel, PhD
Lineke Begeman, DVM DECVP (PhD student)
Marco van de Bildt, BSc
Peter van Run, BSc
Lonneke Leijten , BSc

  
Selection of publications:

Comparative pathology 2 
Figure 2: Immunohistochemical staining for epithelial cells (red) in a healthy human lung

  Comparative pathology 3
Figure 3: Electron microscopy of SARS virus particles in an alveolar epithelial cells

  Comparative pathology 4
Figure 4: Influenza virus infected primary mouse neuron. Influenza virus antigen (green); beta 3 tubulin (red); nucleus (blue).